WANG Yahui: A Brief History of Time

ESLITE GALLERY is pleased to present “Wang Yahui—A Brief History of Time” from May 18 to June 30, 2019, featuring 18 installations, videos and photography works created between 2005 and 2019 by the artist. In this first solo exhibition in collaboration with ESLITE GALLERY, Wang shares her ruminations about nature, time, life and changes over the past 15 years. Alongside the gallery will publish an artist book documenting Wang’s discussion about five Chinese and Western artists as well as her new artistic direction.

  • Exhibition Period:18 May – 30 June 2019
  • Address:ESLITE GALLERY ∣ 5F, No.11, Songgao Rd., Taipei 11073, Taiwan
  • Opening:15:00-17:00, Sat, 18 May

For this exhibition, Wang Yahui introduces Sunshine on Tranquility, Two Billion Light Years of Solitude and The Tropical Work: Snowman from earlier periods in new ways as an accompaniment to five new series. The new series “Wanderer’s Clock” shows changing configurations that evolve with time, except in a fleeting moment when the pointers align with the order of its world before moving on again in their own tracks. “Traveler” is a space composed by unrelated elements that form a whole when random scraps of paper stumble upon the scene. How can we see nature? Wang writes about time using abstract space and gradients of light in “The Book of Time.” Almost entirely invented by interplays of shadows, “Questions to Shadow” and “Cast Me a Shadow” drift like an afternoon daydream—perhaps, space can also be a feeling?

In “A Brief History of Time,” Wang Yahui turns imageries of contemporary life into micro cosmoses and herself an astronomer observing the hidden relationship between nature and all living things. “What is time to us?” Wang is also the inquisitive Huizi debating about the happiness of fish in Zhuangzi. Her cosmoses are both a condensed essay and a visual poem. There, noise fades and time decelerates, so that floating light and passing shadow arrest for our probing gaze.

WANG Yahui

Wang Yahui turns imageries of contemporary life into micro cosmoses and herself an astronomer observing the hidden relationship between nature and all living things. “What is time to us?” Wang is also the inquisitive Huizi debating about the happiness of fish in Zhuangzi. Her cosmoses are both a condensed essay and a visual poem. There, noise fades and time decelerates, so that floating light and passing shadow arrest for our probing gaze.