Breeze from Paris

Outstanding works of art by Lalan, T’ang Haywen, Hsiung Ping-Ming, Pan Yulin, and Sanyu are shown in the exhibition “Breeze from Paris”, representing the glory of the Chiese artists of the 20th century.

  • Exhibition Period:31 May 2014 – 29 Jun 2014
  • Address:ESLITE GALLERY∣5F, No. 11, Songgao Rd., Taipei 11073, Taiwan
  • Opening Hours:31 May 2014

Outstanding works of art by Lalan, T’ang Haywen, Hsiung Ping-Ming, Pan Yulin, and Sanyu are shown in the exhibition “Breeze from Paris”, representing the glory of the Chiese artists of the 20th century.

The exhibition is mainly devoted to Lalan, a distinguished artist who had been active in France, however, is lesser known in Asia through her painting than her role as the first wife of Zao Wou-ki. Some 30 pieces of painting from different periods of Lalan’s creative career will be shown, providing a comprehensive overview of her achievement in the field of art.

Born in 1921, Lalan was brought up in a scholarly family, where her gift in music was cultivated from a young age. At the age of 14, Lalan met Zao Wou-ki who would become an internationally renowned artist later, and married him a few years later. The couple moved to Paris in 1948 where Lalan continued her studies in music composition and modern dance while being Zao’s muse. She took up painting after divorcing Zao in 1957 and had never cease painting till an accident took her life in 1995. Lalan started out creating abstract paintings with calligraphic signs under Zao’s inspiration. However, she quickly developed a distinct style driven by her strong urge of self-expression. Spirit of Chinese traditional landscapes was brought into Lalan’s painting during 1970’s and the artist’s accomplishments of music and modern dance also add graceful qualities of poetry and rhythm in her works.

Apart from Lalan’s paintings, “Breeze from Paris” will also show abstract works on paper by T’ang Haywen, works infused with feminine charm by Pan Yulin, sculptures by Hsiung Ping-Ming and sketches by Sanyu, representing the great era when cultures of Oriental and Occidental met and fruited into magnificent art. 

Lalan

Standing between two great cultures of Chinese and France, Lalan created splendid paintings that blended the Western abstraction and Chinese landscape while expressing the spirit of a modern woman.

Born in 1924, Lalan was brought up in a scholarly family, where her gift in music was cultivated from a young age. Lalan moved to Paris in 1948 where she started composing music and later study modern dance in Conservatoire nationale supérieur de musique et de danse de Paris (CNSMDP or Conservatoire de Paris). Driven by passion for visual art, she took up painting after divorcing Zao Wou-ki in 1957 and had never ceased painting till an accident took her life in 1995. Lalan started out creating abstract paintings with calligraphic signs under Zao’s inspiration. However, she quickly developed a distinct style driven by her strong urge of self-expression. Lalan used saturated colors to express her strong feelings. For instance, she would spray out blue or brown color on the canvas and then painted over with heavy brushworks of black and white. Spirit of Chinese traditional landscapes was brought into Lalan’s painting during 1970’s and the artist’s accomplishments of music and modern dance also add graceful qualities of poetry and rhythm in her works.

T’ANG Haywen

Born in Fujian, China, T’ang Haywen was a self-taught artist spending most of his professional life in Paris. As a child, T’ang had studied Chinese calligraphy under the instruction of his grandfather. After he moved to Paris in 1948 to continue his Medical education, he soon acquainted himself with the work of western artists and chose to be a painter.

Ink was the means of T’ang’s creation since he regarded it as the paramount medium of the Oriental painting since the end of the 9th century. Shaped by the spiritual elements of the Taoist approach to painting as well as the influences of the Western masters of the impressionism and modernism, T’ang found his own path through ink painting to capture the interplay of energies that give life to the natural world.

Sanyu

Sanyu’s work uniquely blended the romantic quality of the West and spirit of Chinese literati, evolving into charming art that marks a distinct achievement of Chinese art in the 20th century. Sanyu was born in Szechuan, China in 1901. He had attended the Shanghai Art Academy and went to Japan in 1901. Sanyu arrived in Paris in the following year and soon adapted the life style of the city where he would stay for the rest of his life. By early 30s, Sanyu had made quite a name for himself in France. Fusing the unrestrained style of Chinese ink painting with the clean, spare qualities of the Fauvist school, the artist invested his paintings with characteristically Chinese reflection and emotional subtlety.

PAN Yulin

Renowned as the first Chinese female modern artist established firmly in the Western art scene, Pan Yulin’s art is bold and firm in terms of both her brushstrokes and ambition. Nevertheless, feminine quality and consciousness were never lost in her work. Received academic training in Shanghai and Paris, Pan’s works demonstrate techniques from the Fauvism and Impressionist schools of art but always retained an individual style of her own which displayed the unmistakable characteristics of traditional Chinese painting. Pan’s works can be found in the Asian art collections of well-known French museums, including Musée Cernuschi, Musée National d’Art Moderne and Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. When she passed away, she had bequeathed to the Anhui Museum in China several thousand of her original works and sketches, as a tribute to her native village.

HSIUNG Ping-Ming

Hsiung Ping-Ming was a sculptor, calligrapher, and art critic, who was born in China and lived and worked in Paris for most of his professional life.  Hsiung went to Paris to continue his education in philosophy in 1947, but was later inspired by the sculptor Marcel Gimond and enrolled at the École des Beaux-Arts in 1950 to train with him. Human figure and animals are the subjects of Hsiung’s sculptures. One of the themes the artist kept coming back to was buffalo, which used to be the major working animal in the farm in the pre-industrialized era of China through which the artist expressed his strong well as well as his feelings toward his homeland.