Shida Kuo Solo Exhibition

The new exhibition shows Shida KUO’s latest curiosity in architecture that propelled him to explore similarities between architectural buildings and sculptures. The quest has consolidated into a distinctive artistic direction that, like KUO’s previous works, resonates with antiquity yet at the same time exudes a more modern and sleek feel. KUO is also devoting more time to develop his paintings, which his treats in the same way he goes about creating a sculpture. He places the subject in the center of the image and uses a spatula instead of a paint brush to “mold” the painting. And with the changing colors and textures in the paintings, the artist reveals different expressions of sentiment. If there is a painting quality to KUO’s sculptures, there is also a sculptural quality to his paintings.

  • Exhibition Period:05 Jun 2010 – 27 Jun 2010
  • Address:ESLITE GALLERY∣5F, No. 11, Songgao Rd., Taipei 11073, Taiwan
  • Opening Hours:5 June 2010

The new exhibition shows Shida KUO’s latest curiosity in architecture that propelled him to explore similarities between architectural buildings and sculptures. The quest has consolidated into a distinctive artistic direction that, like KUO’s previous works, resonates with antiquity yet at the same time exudes a more modern and sleek feel. KUO is also devoting more time to develop his paintings, which his treats in the same way he goes about creating a sculpture. He places the subject in the center of the image and uses a spatula instead of a paint brush to “mold” the painting. And with the changing colors and textures in the paintings, the artist reveals different expressions of sentiment. If there is a painting quality to KUO’s sculptures, there is also a sculptural quality to his paintings.

Originally trained as a painter in college, Shida KUO’s fascination with forms and materials is what led him to the world of sculpture. After moving to New York approximately 20 years ago, KUO paid frequent visits to the American Museum of Natural History, and observed that different ethic groups seem to be moved by similar forms or materials. Thus he began a long-term observation and documentation of natural objects, in search of the “quintessential” form. He is curious about how people of different origins and backgrounds could respond to forms and materials in an identical way. “It seems to me that those shared experiences of emotional and spiritual impacts created by forms and materials have been articulated by our bodies even before they could be understood by our minds,” said KUO. As KUO accumulates all sorts of fragments or incomplete shapes in his mind, and after conflicts and convergences, they are united to become the individual entities of his sculpture work. KUO exhibits internationally and is an instructor in the Department of Art and Art Professions at New York University.

Shida KUO

Shida KUO was born in Taiwan in 1959; he received his master in sculpture from New York University in 1992 and continues to work in New York. KUO is in search of forms that have a basic, pre-linguistic relationship to our bodies, forms that are “repressed by our consciousness but are persistent in our veins”.

The choice of material is integral to the concept of KUO’s art. He intentionally uses clay and wood to maintain a deeply felt affinity with that which makes us human. KUO insists that each work is individual and refuses to create within the constraints of series; he also refuses to enforce a title onto his work. The best way to appreciate his art, according to the artist himself, is to “live with it for some time”.

The paintings KUO exhibited along the sculptures are to be viewed as an extension of the ceramic works and a continuous exploration of interior spaces. KUO treats his paintings as “flat sculptures”, a term which accent its three-dimensional feature. KUO blends fiber, mica powder, and sand into acrylic paint to explore new creative possibilities, he also uses oil pastels for fine processing on his “flat sculptures”.

KUO’s simplified earthenware forms, richly tactile, talismanic, dense and hermetic, seem to allude to ancient knowledge, to wordless secrets that may be revealed through contemplative touching of the object. “By combining the organic quality of nature with the psychological ambiguities of the inner self, I seek to create my own vocabulary of forms which convey a spiritual perspective.”